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Zyprexa (Lake Erie Medical DBA Quality Care Products LLC)

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  • BOXED WARNING(What is this?)

    BOXED WARNING

    WARNING: INCREASED MORTALITY IN ELDERLY PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA-RELATED PSYCHOSIS

    Elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis treated with antipsychotic drugs are at an increased risk of death. Analyses of seventeen placebo-controlled trials (modal duration of 10 weeks), largely in patients taking atypical antipsychotic drugs, revealed a risk of death in drug-treated patients of between 1.6 to 1.7 times the risk of death in placebo-treated patients. Over the course of a typical 10-week controlled trial, the rate of death in drug-treated patients was about 4.5%, compared to a rate of about 2.6% in the placebo group. Although the causes of death were varied, most of the deaths appeared to be either cardiovascular (e.g., heart failure, sudden death) or infectious (e.g., pneumonia) in nature. Observational studies suggest that, similar to atypical antipsychotic drugs, treatment with conventional antipsychotic drugs may increase mortality. The extent to which the findings of increased mortality in observational studies may be attributed to the antipsychotic drug as opposed to some characteristic(s) of the patients is not clear. ZYPREXA (olanzapine) is not approved for the treatment of patients with dementia-related psychosis [see Warnings and Precautions (5.1, 5.14) and Patient Counseling Information (17.2)].

    When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Boxed Warning section of the package insert for Symbyax.


  • HIGHLIGHTS OF PRESCRIBING INFORMATION
    Zyprexa 15 mg These highlights do not include all the information needed to use. See full prescribing information for and initial U.S. approval

    INDICATIONS AND USAGE

    ZYPREXA® (olanzapine) is an atypical antipsychotic indicated:

    As oral formulation for the:

    • Treatment of schizophrenia. (1.1)
      • Adults: Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in patients with schizophrenia: two 6-week trials and one maintenance trial. (14.1)
      • Adolescents (ages 13-17): Efficacy was established in one 6-week trial in patients with schizophrenia (14.1). The increased potential (in adolescents compared with adults) for weight gain and hyperlipidemia may lead clinicians to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents. (1.1)
    • Acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder. (1.2)
      • Adults: Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in patients with manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder: two 3- to 4-week trials and one maintenance trial. (14.2)
      • Adolescents (ages 13-17): Efficacy was established in one 3-week trial in patients with manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder (14.2). The increased potential (in adolescents compared with adults) for weight gain and hyperlipidemia may lead clinicians to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents. (1.2)
    • Medication therapy for pediatric patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder should be undertaken only after a thorough diagnostic evaluation and with careful consideration of the potential risks. (1.3)
    • Adjunct to valproate or lithium in the treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. (1.2)
      • Efficacy was established in two 6-week clinical trials in adults (14.2). Maintenance efficacy has not been systematically evaluated.

    As ZYPREXA IntraMuscular for the:

    • Treatment of acute agitation associated with schizophrenia and bipolar I mania. (1.4)
      • Efficacy was established in three 1-day trials in adults. (14.3)

    As ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination for the:

    • Treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder. (1.5)
      • Efficacy was established with Symbyax (olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination) in adults; refer to the product label for Symbyax.
    • Treatment of treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in patients who do not respond to 2 separate trials of different antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode). (1.6)
      • Efficacy was established with Symbyax (olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination) in adults; refer to the product label for Symbyax.

    ADVERSE REACTIONS

    Most common adverse reactions (≥5% and at least twice that for placebo) associated with:

    Oral Olanzapine Monotherapy:

    • Schizophrenia (Adults) – postural hypotension, constipation, weight gain, dizziness, personality disorder, akathisia (6.1)
    • Schizophrenia (Adolescents) – sedation, weight increased, headache, increased appetite, dizziness, abdominal pain, pain in extremity, fatigue, dry mouth (6.1)
    • Manic or Mixed Episodes, Bipolar I Disorder (Adults) – asthenia, dry mouth, constipation, increased appetite, somnolence, dizziness, tremor (6.1)
    • Manic or Mixed Episodes, Bipolar I Disorder (Adolescents) – sedation, weight increased, increased appetite, headache, fatigue, dizziness, dry mouth, abdominal pain, pain in extremity (6.1)

    Combination of ZYPREXA and Lithium or Valproate:

    • Manic or Mixed Episodes, Bipolar I Disorder (Adults) – dry mouth, weight gain, increased appetite, dizziness, back pain, constipation, speech disorder, increased salivation, amnesia, paresthesia (6.1)

    ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Also refer to the Adverse Reactions section of the package insert for Symbyax. (6)

    ZYPREXA IntraMuscular for Injection:

    • Agitation with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania (Adults) – somnolence (6.1)

    To report SUSPECTED ADVERSE REACTIONS, contact Eli Lilly and Company at 1-800-LillyRx (1-800-545-5979) or FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch


    DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

    • Lower starting dose recommended in debilitated or pharmacodynamically sensitive patients or patients with predisposition to hypotensive reactions, or with potential for slowed metabolism. (2.1)
    • Olanzapine may be given without regard to meals. (2.1)

    ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination:

    • Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability. (2.5, 2.6)
    • Olanzapine monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder or treatment resistant depression. (2.5, 2.6)
    • Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated. (2.5, 2.6)

    See 17 for Medication Guide.

    Revised: 7/2010


  • FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION: CONTENTS*
    *
    • Sections or subsections omitted from the full prescribing information are not listed.

  • DESCRIPTION

    11 DESCRIPTION

    ZYPREXA (olanzapine) is an atypical antipsychotic that belongs to the thienobenzodiazepine class. The chemical designation is 2-methyl-4-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl)-10H-thieno[2,3-b] [1,5]benzodiazepine. The molecular formula is C17H20N4S, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 312.44


  • CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

    12 CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY 12.1 Mechanism of Action

    The mechanism of action of olanzapine, as with other drugs having efficacy in schizophrenia, is unknown. However, it has been proposed that this drug's efficacy in schizophrenia is mediated through a combination of dopamine and serotonin type 2 (5HT2) antagonism. The mechanism of action of olanzapine in the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder is unknown


  • INDICATIONS & USAGE

    1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE 1.1 Schizophrenia

     Oral ZYPREXA is indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia. Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in adult patients with schizophrenia: two 6-week trials and one maintenance trial. In adolescent patients with schizophrenia (ages 13-17), efficacy was established in one 6-week trial [see Clinical Studies (14.1)].

     When deciding among the alternative treatments available for adolescents, clinicians should consider the increased potential (in adolescents as compared with adults) for weight gain and hyperlipidemia. Clinicians should consider the potential long-term risks when prescribing to adolescents, and in many cases this may lead them to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5, 5.6)].

    1.2 Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)

     Monotherapy — Oral ZYPREXA is indicated for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder and maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder. Efficacy was established in three clinical trials in adult patients with manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder: two 3- to 4-week trials and one monotherapy maintenance trial. In adolescent patients with manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder (ages 13-17), efficacy was established in one 3-week trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

     When deciding among the alternative treatments available for adolescents, clinicians should consider the increased potential (in adolescents as compared with adults) for weight gain and hyperlipidemia. Clinicians should consider the potential long-term risks when prescribing to adolescents, and in many cases this may lead them to consider prescribing other drugs first in adolescents [see Warnings and Precautions (5.5, 5.6)].

     Adjunctive Therapy to Lithium or Valproate — Oral ZYPREXA is indicated for the treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder as an adjunct to lithium or valproate. Efficacy was established in two 6-week clinical trials in adults. The effectiveness of adjunctive therapy for longer-term use has not been systematically evaluated in controlled trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

    1.3 Special Considerations in Treating Pediatric Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Disorder

     Pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder are serious mental disorders; however, diagnosis can be challenging. For pediatric schizophrenia, symptom profiles can be variable, and for bipolar I disorder, pediatric patients may have variable patterns of periodicity of manic or mixed symptoms. It is recommended that medication therapy for pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder be initiated only after a thorough diagnostic evaluation has been performed and careful consideration given to the risks associated with medication treatment. Medication treatment for both pediatric schizophrenia and bipolar I disorder should be part of a total treatment program that often includes psychological, educational and social interventions.

    1.4 ZYPREXA IntraMuscular: Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania

    ZYPREXA IntraMuscular is indicated for the treatment of acute agitation associated with schizophrenia and bipolar I mania.

     Efficacy was demonstrated in 3 short-term (24 hours of IM treatment) placebo-controlled trials in agitated adult inpatients with: schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) [see Clinical Studies (14.3)].

    “Psychomotor agitation” is defined in DSM-IV as “excessive motor activity associated with a feeling of inner tension.” Patients experiencing agitation often manifest behaviors that interfere with their diagnosis and care, e.g., threatening behaviors, escalating or urgently distressing behavior, or self-exhausting behavior, leading clinicians to the use of intramuscular antipsychotic medications to achieve immediate control of the agitation.

    1.5 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder

    Oral ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination is indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, based on clinical studies in adult patients. When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

    ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.

    1.6 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Treatment Resistant Depression

    Oral ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination is indicated for the treatment of treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in patients who do not respond to 2 separate trials of different antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode), based on clinical studies in adult patients. When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

    ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of treatment resistant depression.


  • CONTRAINDICATIONS

    4 CONTRAINDICATIONS
    • None with ZYPREXA monotherapy.
    • When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Contraindications section of the package insert for Symbyax.
    • For specific information about the contraindications of lithium or valproate, refer to the Contraindications section of the package inserts for these other products.

  • ADVERSE REACTIONS

    6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

    When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Adverse Reactions section of the package insert for Symbyax.

    6.1 Clinical Trials Experience

    Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect or predict the rates observed in practice.

    Clinical Trials in Adults

    The information below for olanzapine is derived from a clinical trial database for olanzapine consisting of 8661 adult patients with approximately 4165 patient-years of exposure to oral olanzapine and 722 patients with exposure to intramuscular olanzapine for injection. This database includes: (1) 2500 patients who participated in multiple-dose oral olanzapine premarketing trials in schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease representing approximately 1122 patient-years of exposure as of February 14, 1995; (2) 182 patients who participated in oral olanzapine premarketing bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) trials representing approximately 66 patient-years of exposure; (3) 191 patients who participated in an oral olanzapine trial of patients having various psychiatric symptoms in association with Alzheimer's disease representing approximately 29 patient-years of exposure; (4) 5788 patients from 88 additional oral olanzapine clinical trials as of December 31, 2001; and (5) 722 patients who participated in intramuscular olanzapine for injection premarketing trials in agitated patients with schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes), or dementia. In addition, information from the premarketing 6-week clinical study database for olanzapine in combination with lithium or valproate, consisting of 224 patients who participated in bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) trials with approximately 22 patient-years of exposure, is included below.

    The conditions and duration of treatment with olanzapine varied greatly and included (in overlapping categories) open-label and double-blind phases of studies, inpatients and outpatients, fixed-dose and dose-titration studies, and short-term or longer-term exposure. Adverse reactions were assessed by collecting adverse reactions, results of physical examinations, vital signs, weights, laboratory analytes, ECGs, chest x-rays, and results of ophthalmologic examinations.

    Certain portions of the discussion below relating to objective or numeric safety parameters, namely, dose-dependent adverse reactions, vital sign changes, weight gain, laboratory changes, and ECG changes are derived from studies in patients with schizophrenia and have not been duplicated for bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) or agitation. However, this information is also generally applicable to bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) and agitation.

    Adverse reactions during exposure were obtained by spontaneous report and recorded by clinical investigators using terminology of their own choosing. Consequently, it is not possible to provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of individuals experiencing adverse reactions without first grouping similar types of reactions into a smaller number of standardized reaction categories. In the tables and tabulations that follow, MedDRA and COSTART Dictionary terminology has been used to classify reported adverse reactions.

    The stated frequencies of adverse reactions represent the proportion of individuals who experienced, at least once, a treatment-emergent adverse reaction of the type listed. A reaction was considered treatment emergent if it occurred for the first time or worsened while receiving therapy following baseline evaluation. The reported reactions do not include those reaction terms that were so general as to be uninformative. Reactions listed elsewhere in labeling may not be repeated below. It is important to emphasize that, although the reactions occurred during treatment with olanzapine, they were not necessarily caused by it. The entire label should be read to gain a complete understanding of the safety profile of olanzapine.

    The prescriber should be aware that the figures in the tables and tabulations cannot be used to predict the incidence of side effects in the course of usual medical practice where patient characteristics and other factors differ from those that prevailed in the clinical trials. Similarly, the cited frequencies cannot be compared with figures obtained from other clinical investigations involving different treatments, uses, and investigators. The cited figures, however, do provide the prescribing physician with some basis for estimating the relative contribution of drug and nondrug factors to the adverse reactions incidence in the population studied.

    Incidence of Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled and Combination Trials

    The following findings are based on premarketing trials of (1) oral olanzapine for schizophrenia, bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes), a subsequent trial of patients having various psychiatric symptoms in association with Alzheimer's disease, and premarketing combination trials, and (2) intramuscular olanzapine for injection in agitated patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I mania.

    Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Schizophrenia — Overall, there was no difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (5% for oral olanzapine vs 6% for placebo). However, discontinuations due to increases in ALT were considered to be drug related (2% for oral olanzapine vs 0% for placebo).

    Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes) Monotherapy — Overall, there was no difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (2% for oral olanzapine vs 2% for placebo).

    Agitation — Overall, there was no difference in the incidence of discontinuation due to adverse reactions (0.4% for intramuscular olanzapine for injection vs 0% for placebo).

    Adverse Reactions Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in Short-Term Combination Trials

    Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes), Olanzapine as Adjunct to Lithium or Valproate â€” In a study of patients who were already tolerating either lithium or valproate as monotherapy, discontinuation rates due to adverse reactions were 11% for the combination of oral olanzapine with lithium or valproate compared to 2% for patients who remained on lithium or valproate monotherapy. Discontinuations with the combination of oral olanzapine and lithium or valproate that occurred in more than 1 patient were: somnolence (3%), weight gain (1%), and peripheral edema (1%).

    Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    The most commonly observed adverse reactions associated with the use of oral olanzapine (incidence of 5% or greater) and not observed at an equivalent incidence among placebo-treated patients (olanzapine incidence at least twice that for placebo) were:

    Differences among Fixed-Dose Groups Observed in Other Olanzapine Clinical Trials

    In a single 8-week randomized, double-blind, fixed-dose study comparing 10 (N=199), 20 (N=200) and 40 (N=200) mg/day of oral olanzapine in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, differences among 3 dose groups were observed for the following safety outcomes: weight gain, prolactin elevation, fatigue and dizziness. Mean baseline to endpoint increase in weight (10 mg/day: 1.9 kg; 20 mg/day: 2.3 kg; 40 mg/day: 3 kg) was observed with significant differences between 10 vs 40 mg/day. Incidence of treatment-emergent prolactin elevation greater than 24.2 ng/mL (female) or greater than 18.77 ng/mL (male) at any time during the trial (10 mg/day: 31.2%; 20 mg/day: 42.7%; 40 mg/day: 61.1%) with significant differences between 10 vs 40 mg/day and 20 vs 40 mg/day; fatigue (10 mg/day: 1.5%; 20 mg/day: 2.1%; 40 mg/day: 6.6%) with significant differences between 10 vs 40 and 20 vs 40 mg/day; and dizziness (10 mg/day: 2.6%; 20 mg/day: 1.6%; 40 mg/day: 6.6%) with significant differences between 20 vs 40 mg, was observed.

    Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Clinical Trial Evaluation of Oral Olanzapine

    Following is a list of treatment-emergent adverse reactions reported by patients treated with oral olanzapine (at multiple doses ≥1 mg/day) in clinical trials. This listing is not intended to include reactions (1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, (2) for which a drug cause was remote, (3) which were so general as to be uninformative, (4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or (5) which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo. Reactions are classified by body system using the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients; rare reactions are those occurring in fewer than 1/1000 patients.

      Body as a Whole — Infrequent: chills, face edema, photosensitivity reaction, suicide attempt 1; Rare: chills and fever, hangover effect, sudden death 1.   Cardiovascular System — Infrequent: cerebrovascular accident, vasodilatation.   Digestive System — Infrequent: nausea and vomiting, tongue edema; Rare: ileus, intestinal obstruction, liver fatty deposit.   Hemic and Lymphatic System — Infrequent: leukopenia, thrombocytopenia.   Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders — Infrequent: alkaline phosphatase increased, bilirubinemia, hypoproteinemia.   Musculoskeletal System — Rare: osteoporosis.   Nervous System — Infrequent: ataxia, dysarthria, libido decreased, stupor; Rare: coma.   Respiratory System — Infrequent: epistaxis; Rare: lung edema.   Skin and Appendages — Infrequent: alopecia.   Special Senses — Infrequent: abnormality of accommodation, dry eyes; Rare: mydriasis.   Urogenital System — Infrequent: amenorrhea 2, breast pain, decreased menstruation, impotence 2, increased menstruation 2, menorrhagia 2, metrorrhagia 2, polyuria 2, urinary frequency, urinary retention, urinary urgency, urination impaired.

    1 These terms represent serious adverse events but do not meet the definition for adverse drug reactions. They are included here because of their seriousness.

    2 Adjusted for gender.

    Other Adverse Reactions Observed During the Clinical Trial Evaluation of Intramuscular Olanzapine for Injection

    Following is a list of treatment-emergent adverse reactions reported by patients treated with intramuscular olanzapine for injection (at 1 or more doses ≥2.5 mg/injection) in clinical trials. This listing is not intended to include reactions (1) already listed in previous tables or elsewhere in labeling, (2) for which a drug cause was remote, (3) which were so general as to be uninformative, (4) which were not considered to have significant clinical implications, or (5) for which occurred at a rate equal to or less than placebo. Reactions are classified by body system using the following definitions: frequent adverse reactions are those occurring in at least 1/100 patients; infrequent adverse reactions are those occurring in 1/100 to 1/1000 patients.

      Body as a Whole — Frequent: injection site pain.   Cardiovascular System — Infrequent: syncope.   Digestive System — Infrequent: nausea.   Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders — Infrequent: creatine phosphokinase increased.

    Clinical Trials in Adolescent Patients (age 13 to 17 years)

    Commonly Observed Adverse Reactions in Oral Olanzapine Short-Term, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    Adverse reactions in adolescent patients treated with oral olanzapine (doses ≥2.5 mg) reported with an incidence of 5% or more and reported at least twice as frequently as placebo-treated patients are listed in Table 21.

    6.2 Vital Signs and Laboratory Studies

    Vital Sign Changes — Oral olanzapine was associated with orthostatic hypotension and tachycardia in clinical trials. Intramuscular olanzapine for injection was associated with bradycardia, hypotension, and tachycardia in clinical trials [see Warnings and Precautions (5)].

    Laboratory Changes

    Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adults: An assessment of the premarketing experience for olanzapine revealed an association with asymptomatic increases in ALT, AST, and GGT. Within the original premarketing database of about 2400 adult patients with baseline ALT less than or equal to 90 IU/L, the incidence of ALT elevations to greater than 200 IU/L was 2% (50/2381). None of these patients experienced jaundice or other symptoms attributable to liver impairment and most had transient changes that tended to normalize while olanzapine treatment was continued.

    In placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies in adults, clinically significant ALT elevations (change from less than 3 times the upper limit of normal al[ULN] at baseline to greater than or equal to 3 times ULN) were observed in 5% (77/1426) of patients exposed to olanzapine compared to 1% (10/1187) of patients exposed to placebo. ALT elevations greater than or  equal to 5 times ULN were observed in 2% (29/1438) of olanzapine-treated patients, compared to 0.3% (4/1196) of placebo-treated patients. ALT values returned to normal, or were decreasing, at last follow-up in the majority of patients who either continued treatment with olanzapine or discontinued olanzapine. No patient with elevated ALT values experienced jaundice, liver failure, or met the criteria for Hy's Rule.

    Rare postmarketing reports of hepatitis have been received. Very rare cases of cholestatic or mixed liver injury have also been reported in the postmarketing period.

    Caution should be exercised in patients with signs and symptoms of hepatic impairment, in patients with pre-existing conditions associated with limited hepatic functional reserve, and in patients who are being treated with potentially hepatotoxic drugs.

    Olanzapine administration was also associated with increases in serum prolactin [see Warnings and Precautions (5.15)], with an asymptomatic elevation of the eosinophil count in 0.3% of patients, and with an increase in CPK.

    Olanzapine Monotherapy in Adolescents: In placebo-controlled clinical trials of adolescent patients with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes), greater frequencies for the following treatment-emergent findings, at anytime, were observed in laboratory analytes compared to placebo: elevated ALT (≥3X ULN in patients with ALT at baseline less than 3X ULN), (12% vs 2%); elevated AST (28% vs 4%); low total bilirubin (22% vs 7%); elevated GGT (10% vs 1%); and elevated prolactin (47% vs 7%).

    In placebo-controlled olanzapine monotherapy studies in adolescents, clinically significant ALT elevations (change from less than 3 times ULN at baseline to greater than or equal to 3 times ULN) were observed in 12% (22/192) of patients exposed to olanzapine compared to 2% (2/109) of patients exposed to placebo. ALT elevations greater than or equal to 5 times ULN were observed in 4% (8/192) of olanzapine-treated patients, compared to 1% (1/109) of placebo-treated patients. ALT values returned to normal, or were decreasing, at last follow-up in the majority of patients who either continued treatment with olanzapine or discontinued olanzapine. No adolescent patient with elevated ALT values experienced jaundice, liver failure, or met the criteria for Hy's Rule.

    ECG Changes — In pooled studies of adults as well as pooled studies of adolescents, there were no significant differences between olanzapine and placebo in the proportions of patients experiencing potentially important changes in ECG parameters, including QT, QTc (Fridericia corrected), and PR intervals. Olanzapine use was associated with a mean increase in heart rate compared to placebo (adults: +2.4 beats per minute vs no change with placebo; adolescents: +6.3 beats per minute vs -5.1 beats per minute with placebo). This increase in heart rate may be related to olanzapine's potential for inducing orthostatic changes [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)].

    6.3 Postmarketing Experience

    The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of ZYPREXA. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is difficult to reliably estimate their frequency or evaluate a causal relationship to drug exposure.

    Adverse reactions reported since market introduction that were temporally (but not necessarily causally) related to ZYPREXA therapy include the following: allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylactoid reaction, angioedema, pruritus or urticaria), diabetic coma, diabetic ketoacidosis, discontinuation reaction (diaphoresis, nausea or vomiting), jaundice, neutropenia, pancreatitis, priapism, rash, rhabdomyolysis, and venous thromboembolic events (including pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis). Random cholesterol levels of ≥240 mg/dL and random triglyceride levels of ≥1000 mg/dL have been reported.


  • OVERDOSAGE

    10 OVERDOSAGE

    10.1 Human Experience

    In premarketing trials involving more than 3100 patients and/or normal subjects, accidental or intentional acute overdosage of olanzapine was identified in 67 patients. In the patient taking the largest identified amount, 300 mg, the only symptoms reported were drowsiness and slurred speech. In the limited number of patients who were evaluated in hospitals, including the patient taking 300 mg, there were no observations indicating an adverse change in laboratory analytes or ECG. Vital signs were usually within normal limits following overdoses.

    In postmarketing reports of overdose with olanzapine alone, symptoms have been reported in the majority of cases. In symptomatic patients, symptoms with ≥10% incidence included agitation/aggressiveness, dysarthria, tachycardia, various extrapyramidal symptoms, and reduced level of consciousness ranging from sedation to coma. Among less commonly reported symptoms were the following potentially medically serious reactions: aspiration, cardiopulmonary arrest, cardiac arrhythmias (such as supraventricular tachycardia and 1 patient experiencing sinus pause with spontaneous resumption of normal rhythm), delirium, possible neuroleptic malignant syndrome, respiratory depression/arrest, convulsion, hypertension, and hypotension. Eli Lilly and Company has received reports of fatality in association with overdose of olanzapine alone. In 1 case of death, the amount of acutely ingested olanzapine was reported to be possibly as low as 450 mg of oral olanzapine; however, in another case, a patient was reported to survive an acute olanzapine ingestion of approximately 2 g of oral olanzapine.


    10.2 Management of Overdose

    The possibility of multiple drug involvement should be considered. In case of acute overdosage, establish and maintain an airway and ensure adequate oxygenation and ventilation, which may include intubation. Gastric lavage (after intubation, if patient is unconscious) and administration of activated charcoal together with a laxative should be considered. The administration of activated charcoal (1 g) reduced the Cmax and AUC of oral olanzapine by about 60%. As peak olanzapine levels are not typically obtained until about 6 hours after dosing, charcoal may be a useful treatment for olanzapine overdose.

    The possibility of obtundation, seizures, or dystonic reaction of the head and neck following overdose may create a risk of aspiration with induced emesis. Cardiovascular monitoring should commence immediately and should include continuous electrocardiographic monitoring to detect possible arrhythmias.

    There is no specific antidote to olanzapine. Therefore, appropriate supportive measures should be initiated. Hypotension and circulatory collapse should be treated with appropriate measures such as intravenous fluids and/or sympathomimetic agents. (Do not use epinephrine, dopamine, or other sympathomimetics with beta-agonist activity, since beta stimulation may worsen hypotension in the setting of olanzapine-induced alpha blockade.) Close medical supervision and monitoring should continue until the patient recovers.

    For specific information about overdosage with lithium or valproate, refer to the Overdosage section of the package inserts for these products. For specific information about overdosage with olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination, refer to the Overdosage section of the Symbyax package insert.


  • DOSAGE & ADMINISTRATION

    2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION 2.1 Schizophrenia

    Adults

    Dose Selection — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 to 10 mg initially, with a target dose of 10 mg/day within several days. Further dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 1 week, since steady state for olanzapine would not be achieved for approximately 1 week in the typical patient. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 5 mg QD are recommended.

    Efficacy in schizophrenia was demonstrated in a dose range of 10 to 15 mg/day in clinical trials. However, doses above 10 mg/day were not demonstrated to be more efficacious than the 10 mg/day dose. An increase to a dose greater than the target dose of 10 mg/day (i.e., to a dose of 15 mg/day or greater) is recommended only after clinical assessment. Olanzapine is not indicated for use in doses above 20 mg/day.

    Dosing in Special Populations — The recommended starting dose is 5 mg in patients who are debilitated, who have a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, who otherwise exhibit a combination of factors that may result in slower metabolism of olanzapine (e.g., nonsmoking female patients ≥65 years of age), or who may be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. When indicated, dose escalation should be performed with caution in these patients.

     Maintenance Treatment — The effectiveness of oral olanzapine, 10 mg/day to 20 mg/day, in maintaining treatment response in schizophrenic patients who had been stable on ZYPREXA for approximately 8 weeks and were then followed for relapse has been demonstrated in a placebo-controlled trial [see Clinical Studies (14.1)]. The physician who elects to use ZYPREXA for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.

     Adolescents

     Dose Selection — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals with a recommended starting dose of 2.5 or 5 mg, with a target dose of 10 mg/day. Efficacy in adolescents with schizophrenia was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials, with a mean modal dose of 12.5 mg/day (mean dose of 11.1 mg/day). When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

     The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.1)].

     Maintenance Treatment — The efficacy of ZYPREXA for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in the adolescent population has not been systematically evaluated; however, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. Thus, it is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

    2.2 Bipolar I Disorder (Manic or Mixed Episodes)

    Adults

    Dose Selection for Monotherapy — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals, generally beginning with 10 or 15 mg. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should generally occur at intervals of not less than 24 hours, reflecting the procedures in the placebo-controlled trials. When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 5 mg QD are recommended.

    Short-term (3-4 weeks) antimanic efficacy was demonstrated in a dose range of 5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials. The safety of doses above 20 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

    Maintenance Monotherapy — The benefit of maintaining bipolar I patients on monotherapy with oral ZYPREXA at a dose of 5 to 20 mg/day, after achieving a responder status for an average duration of 2 weeks, was demonstrated in a controlled trial [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The physician who elects to use ZYPREXA for extended periods should periodically reevaluate the long-term usefulness of the drug for the individual patient.

     Dose Selection for Adjunctive Treatment â€” When administered as adjunctive treatment to lithium or valproate, oral olanzapine dosing should generally begin with 10 mg once-a-day without regard to meals.

     Antimanic efficacy was demonstrated in a dose range of 5 mg to 20 mg/day in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)]. The safety of doses above 20 mg/day has not been evaluated in clinical trials.

     Adolescents

     Dose Selection — Oral olanzapine should be administered on a once-a-day schedule without regard to meals with a recommended starting dose of 2.5 or 5 mg, with a target dose of 10 mg/day. Efficacy in adolescents with bipolar I disorder (manic or mixed episodes) was demonstrated based on a flexible dose range of 2.5 to 20 mg/day in clinical trials, with a mean modal dose of 10.7 mg/day (mean dose of 8.9 mg/day). When dosage adjustments are necessary, dose increments/decrements of 2.5 or 5 mg are recommended.

     The safety and effectiveness of doses above 20 mg/day have not been evaluated in clinical trials [see Clinical Studies (14.2)].

     Maintenance Treatment — The efficacy of ZYPREXA for the maintenance treatment of bipolar I disorder in the adolescent population has not been evaluated; however, maintenance efficacy can be extrapolated from adult data along with comparisons of olanzapine pharmacokinetic parameters in adult and adolescent patients. Thus, it is generally recommended that responding patients be continued beyond the acute response, but at the lowest dose needed to maintain remission. Patients should be periodically reassessed to determine the need for maintenance treatment.

    2.3 Administration of ZYPREXA ZYDIS (olanzapine orally disintegrating tablets)

    After opening sachet, peel back foil on blister. Do not push tablet through foil. Immediately upon opening the blister, using dry hands, remove tablet and place entire ZYPREXA ZYDIS in the mouth. Tablet disintegration occurs rapidly in saliva so it can be easily swallowed with or without liquid.

    2.4 ZYPREXA IntraMuscular: Agitation Associated with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania

    Dose Selection for Agitated Adult Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar I Mania â€” The efficacy of intramuscular olanzapine for injection in controlling agitation in these disorders was demonstrated in a dose range of 2.5 mg to 10 mg. The recommended dose in these patients is 10 mg. A lower dose of 5 or 7.5 mg may be considered when clinical factors warrant [see Clinical Studies (14.3)]. If agitation warranting additional intramuscular doses persists following the initial dose, subsequent doses up to 10 mg may be given. However, the efficacy of repeated doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection in agitated patients has not been systematically evaluated in controlled clinical trials. Also, the safety of total daily doses greater than 30 mg, or 10 mg injections given more frequently than 2 hours after the initial dose, and 4 hours after the second dose have not been evaluated in clinical trials. Maximal dosing of intramuscular olanzapine (e.g., 3 doses of 10 mg administered 2-4 hours apart) may be associated with a substantial occurrence of significant orthostatic hypotension [see Warnings and Precautions (5.8)]. Thus, it is recommended that patients requiring subsequent intramuscular injections be assessed for orthostatic hypotension prior to the administration of any subsequent doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection. The administration of an additional dose to a patient with a clinically significant postural change in systolic blood pressure is not recommended.

    If ongoing olanzapine therapy is clinically indicated, oral olanzapine may be initiated in a range of 5-20 mg/day as soon as clinically appropriate [see Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.2)].

    Intramuscular Dosing in Special Populations — A dose of 5 mg/injection should be considered for geriatric patients or when other clinical factors warrant. A lower dose of 2.5 mg/injection should be considered for patients who otherwise might be debilitated, be predisposed to hypotensive reactions, or be more pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

    Administration of ZYPREXA IntraMuscular — ZYPREXA IntraMuscular is intended for intramuscular use only. Do not administer intravenously or subcutaneously. Inject slowly, deep into the muscle mass.

    Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration, whenever solution and container permit.

    Directions for Preparation of ZYPREXA IntraMuscular with Sterile Water for Injection — Dissolve the contents of the vial using 2.1 mL of Sterile Water for Injection to provide a solution containing approximately 5 mg/mL of olanzapine. The resulting solution should appear clear and yellow. ZYPREXA IntraMuscular reconstituted with Sterile Water for Injection should be used immediately (within 1 hour) after reconstitution. Discard any unused portion.

    The following table provides injection volumes for delivering various doses of intramuscular olanzapine for injection reconstituted with Sterile Water for Injection.

    Physical Incompatibility Information — ZYPREXA IntraMuscular should be reconstituted only with Sterile Water for Injection. ZYPREXA IntraMuscular should not be combined in a syringe with diazepam injection because precipitation occurs when these products are mixed. Lorazepam injection should not be used to reconstitute ZYPREXA IntraMuscular as this combination results in a delayed reconstitution time. ZYPREXA IntraMuscular should not be combined in a syringe with haloperidol injection because the resulting low pH has been shown to degrade olanzapine over time.

    2.5 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Depressive Episodes Associated with Bipolar I Disorder

    When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

    Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability within dose ranges of oral olanzapine 5 to 12.5 mg and fluoxetine 20 to 50 mg. Antidepressant efficacy was demonstrated with ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination in adult patients with a dose range of olanzapine 6 to 12 mg and fluoxetine 25 to 50 mg.

    Safety and efficacy of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination was determined in clinical trials supporting approval of Symbyax (fixed dose combination of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine). Symbyax is dosed between 3 mg/25 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day and 12 mg/50 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day. The following table demonstrates the appropriate individual component doses of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine versus Symbyax. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability.

    While there is no body of evidence to answer the question of how long a patient treated with ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination should remain on it, it is generally accepted that bipolar I disorder, including the depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder, is a chronic illness requiring chronic treatment. The physician should periodically reexamine the need for continued pharmacotherapy.

    Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in clinical studies.

    ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for the treatment of depressive episodes associated with bipolar I disorder.

    2.6 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Treatment Resistant Depression

    When using ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination, also refer to the Clinical Studies section of the package insert for Symbyax.

    Oral olanzapine should be administered in combination with fluoxetine once daily in the evening, without regard to meals, generally beginning with 5 mg of oral olanzapine and 20 mg of fluoxetine. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, can be made according to efficacy and tolerability within dose ranges of oral olanzapine 5 to 20 mg and fluoxetine 20 to 50 mg. Antidepressant efficacy was demonstrated with olanzapine and fluoxetine in combination in adult patients with a dose range of olanzapine 6 to 18 mg and fluoxetine 25 to 50 mg.

    Safety and efficacy of olanzapine in combination with fluoxetine was determined in clinical trials supporting approval of Symbyax (fixed dose combination of olanzapine and fluoxetine). Symbyax is dosed between 3 mg/25 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day and 12 mg/50 mg (olanzapine/fluoxetine) per day. Table 1 above demonstrates the appropriate individual component doses of ZYPREXA and fluoxetine versus Symbyax. Dosage adjustments, if indicated, should be made with the individual components according to efficacy and tolerability.

    While there is no body of evidence to answer the question of how long a patient treated with ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination should remain on it, it is generally accepted that treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in adult patients who do not respond to 2 separate trials of different antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode) is a chronic illness requiring chronic treatment. The physician should periodically reexamine the need for continued pharmacotherapy.

    Safety of co-administration of doses above 18 mg olanzapine with 75 mg fluoxetine has not been evaluated in clinical studies.

    ZYPREXA monotherapy is not indicated for treatment of treatment resistant depression (major depressive disorder in patients who do not respond to 2 antidepressants of adequate dose and duration in the current episode).

    2.7 ZYPREXA and Fluoxetine in Combination: Dosing in Special Populations

    The starting dose of oral olanzapine 2.5-5 mg with fluoxetine 20 mg should be used for patients with a predisposition to hypotensive reactions, patients with hepatic impairment, or patients who exhibit a combination of factors that may slow the metabolism of olanzapine or fluoxetine in combination (female gender, geriatric age, nonsmoking status), or those patients who may be pharmacodynamically sensitive to olanzapine. Dosing modification may be necessary in patients who exhibit a combination of factors that may slow metabolism. When indicated, dose escalation should be performed with caution in these patients. ZYPREXA and fluoxetine in combination have not been systematically studied in patients over 65 years of age or in patients less than 18 years of age [see Warnings and Precautions (5.14), Drug Interactions (7), and Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].


  • HOW SUPPLIED

    16 HOW SUPPLIED/STORAGE AND HANDLING 16.1 How Supplied

    The ZYPREXA 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 7.5 mg, and 10 mg tablets are white, round, and imprinted in blue ink with LILLY and tablet number. The 15 mg tablets are elliptical, blue, and debossed with LILLY and tablet number. The 20 mg tablets are elliptical, pink, and debossed with LILLY and tablet number. The tablets are available as follows:


    ZYPREXA ZYDIS (olanzapine orally disintegrating tablets) are yellow, round, and debossed with the tablet strength. The tablets are available as follows:

    ZYPREXA IntraMuscular is available in:

      NDC 0002-7597-01 (No. VL7597) – 10 mg vial (1s) 16.2 Storage and Handling

    Store ZYPREXA tablets, ZYPREXA ZYDIS, and ZYPREXA IntraMuscular vials (before reconstitution) at controlled room temperature, 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP]. Reconstituted ZYPREXA IntraMuscular may be stored at controlled room temperature, 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F) [see USP] for up to 1 hour if necessary. Discard any unused portion of reconstituted ZYPREXA IntraMuscular. The USP defines controlled room temperature as a temperature maintained thermostatically that encompasses the usual and customary working environment of 20° to 25°C (68° to 77°F); that results in a mean kinetic temperature calculated to be not more than 25°C; and that allows for excursions between 15° and 30°C (59° and 86°F) that are experienced in pharmacies, hospitals, and warehouses.

    Protect ZYPREXA tablets and ZYPREXA ZYDIS from light and moisture. Protect ZYPREXA IntraMuscular from light, do not freeze.


  • MEDICATION GUIDE

    ZYPREXA - olanzapine  tablet 
    ZYPREXA  ZYDIS - olanzapine  tablet, orally disintegrating 
    ZYPREXA  INTRAMUSCULAR - olanzapine  injection, powder, for solution 
    Eli Lilly and Company

    ----------

    Medication Guide

    ZYPREXA® (zy-PREX-a)

    (olanzapine)

    Tablet

    ZYPREXA® ZYDIS® (zy-PREX-a ZY-dis)

    (olanzapine)

    Tablet, Orally Disintegrating

    Read the Medication Guide that comes with ZYPREXA before you start taking it and each time you get a refill. There may be new information. This Medication Guide does not take the place of talking to your doctor about your medical condition or treatment. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if there is something you do not understand or you want to learn more about ZYPREXA.

    What is the most important information I should know about ZYPREXA?

    Serious side effects may happen when you take ZYPREXA, including:

    Increased risk of death in elderly patients with dementia-related psychosis: Medicines like ZYPREXA can raise the risk of death in elderly people who have lost touch with reality (psychosis) due to confusion and memory loss (dementia). ZYPREXA is not approved for treating psychosis in the elderly with dementia.

    High blood sugar (hyperglycemia): High blood sugar can happen if you have diabetes already or even if you have never had diabetes. In rare cases, this could lead to ketoacidosis (build up of acid in the blood due to ketones), coma, or death. Your doctor should do lab tests to check your blood sugar before you start taking ZYPREXA and during treatment. In people who do not have diabetes, sometimes high blood sugar goes away when ZYPREXA is stopped. People with diabetes and some people who did not have diabetes before taking ZYPREXA need to take medicine for high blood sugar even after they stop taking ZYPREXA.

    If you have diabetes, follow your doctor's instructions about how often to check your blood sugar while taking ZYPREXA.

    Call your doctor if you have any of these symptoms of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) while taking ZYPREXA:

    • feel very thirsty
    • need to urinate more than usual
    • feel very hungry
    • feel weak or tired
    • feel sick to your stomach
    • feel confused, or your breath smells fruity.

    High cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood (fat in the blood) may happen in people treated with ZYPREXA, especially in teenagers (13-17 years old). You may not have any symptoms, so your doctor should do blood tests to check your cholesterol and triglyceride levels before you start taking ZYPREXA and during treatment.

    Increase in weight (weight gain): Weight gain is very common in people who take ZYPREXA. Teenagers (13-17 years old) are more likely to gain weight and to gain more weight than adults. Some people may gain a lot of weight while taking ZYPREXA, so you and your doctor should check your weight regularly. Talk to your doctor about ways to control weight gain, such as eating a healthy, balanced diet, and exercising.

    Increased risk in teenagers (13-17 years old): Possible serious risks of weight gain and increases in cholesterol and triglycerides are more common in teenagers than in adults. You and your doctor should decide if other available treatments should be used first. Before your teenager takes ZYPREXA, talk with your doctor about the possible long-term risks of teenagers taking ZYPREXA.

    What is ZYPREXA?

    ZYPREXA is a prescription medicine used to treat:

    • schizophrenia in people age 13 or older.
    • bipolar disorder, including:
      • manic or mixed episodes that happen with bipolar I disorder in people age 13 or older.
      • manic or mixed episodes that happen with bipolar I disorder, when used with the medicine lithium or valproate, in adults.
      • long-term treatment of bipolar I disorder in adults.
    • episodes of depression that happen with bipolar I disorder, when used with the medicine fluoxetine (Prozac®), in adults.
    • episodes of depression that do not get better after 2 other medicines, also called treatment resistant depression, when used with the medicine fluoxetine (Prozac), in adults.

    ZYPREXA has not been approved for use in children under 13 years of age.

    The symptoms of schizophrenia include hearing voices, seeing things that are not there, having beliefs that are not true, and being suspicious or withdrawn.

    The symptoms of bipolar I disorder include alternating periods of depression and high or irritable mood, increased activity and restlessness, racing thoughts, talking fast, impulsive behavior, and a decreased need for sleep.

    The symptoms of treatment resistant depression include decreased mood, decreased interest, increased guilty feelings, decreased energy, decreased concentration, changes in appetite, and suicidal thoughts or behavior.

    Some of your symptoms may improve with treatment. If you do not think you are getting better, call your doctor.

    What should I tell my doctor before taking ZYPREXA?

    ZYPREXA may not be right for you. Before starting ZYPREXA, tell your doctor if you have or had:

    • heart problems
    • seizures
    • diabetes or high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia)
    • high cholesterol or triglyceride levels in your blood
    • liver problems
    • low or high blood pressure
    • strokes or “mini-strokes” also called transient ischemic attacks (TIAs)
    • Alzheimer's disease
    • narrow-angle glaucoma
    • enlarged prostate in men
    • bowel obstruction
    • phenylketonuria, because ZYPREXA ZYDIS contains phenylalanine
    • breast cancer
    • thoughts of suicide or hurting yourself
    • any other medical condition
    • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if ZYPREXA will harm your unborn baby.
    • are breast-feeding or plan to breast-feed. ZYPREXA can pass into your breast milk and may harm your baby. You should not breast-feed while taking ZYPREXA. Talk to your doctor about the best way to feed your baby if you take ZYPREXA.

    Tell your doctor if you exercise a lot or are in hot places often.

    The symptoms of bipolar I disorder, treatment resistant depression, or schizophrenia may include thoughts of suicide or of hurting yourself or others. If you have these thoughts at any time, tell your doctor or go to an emergency room right away.

    Tell your doctor about all the medicines that you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. ZYPREXA and some medicines may interact with each other and may not work as well, or cause possible serious side effects. Your doctor can tell you if it is safe to take ZYPREXA with your other medicines. Do not start or stop any medicine while taking ZYPREXA without talking to your doctor first.

    How should I take ZYPREXA?

    • Take ZYPREXA exactly as prescribed. Your doctor may need to change (adjust) the dose of ZYPREXA until it is right for you.
    • If you miss a dose of ZYPREXA, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for the next dose, just skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the regular time. Do not take two doses of ZYPREXA at the same time.
    • To prevent serious side effects, do not stop taking ZYPREXA suddenly. If you need to stop taking ZYPREXA, your doctor can tell you how to safely stop taking it.
    • If you take too much ZYPREXA, call your doctor or poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away, or get emergency treatment.
    • ZYPREXA can be taken with or without food.
    • ZYPREXA is usually taken one time each day.
    • Take ZYPREXA ZYDIS as follows:
      • Be sure that your hands are dry.
      • Open the sachet and peel back the foil on the blister. Do not push the tablet through the foil.
      • As soon as you open the blister, remove the tablet and put it into your mouth.
      • The tablet will disintegrate quickly in your saliva so that you can easily swallow it with or without drinking liquid.
    • Call your doctor if you do not think you are getting better or have any concerns about your condition while taking ZYPREXA.

    What should I avoid while taking ZYPREXA?

    • ZYPREXA can cause sleepiness and may affect your ability to make decisions, think clearly, or react quickly. You should not drive, operate heavy machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how ZYPREXA affects you.
    • Avoid drinking alcohol while taking ZYPREXA. Drinking alcohol while you take ZYPREXA may make you sleepier than if you take ZYPREXA alone.

    What are the possible side effects of ZYPREXA?

    Serious side effects may happen when you take ZYPREXA, including:

    • See “What is the most important information I should know about ZYPREXA?”, which describes the increased risk of death in elderly people with dementia-related psychosis and the risks of high blood sugar, high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and weight gain.
    • Increased incidence of stroke or “mini-strokes” called transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) in elderly people with dementia-related psychosis (elderly people who have lost touch with reality due to confusion and memory loss). ZYPREXA is not approved for these patients.
    • Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome (NMS): NMS is a rare but very serious condition that can happen in people who take antipsychotic medicines, including ZYPREXA. NMS can cause death and must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you become severely ill and have any of these symptoms:
      • high fever
      • excessive sweating
      • rigid muscles
      • confusion
      • changes in your breathing, heartbeat, and blood pressure.
    • Tardive Dyskinesia: This condition causes body movements that keep happening and that you can not control. These movements usually affect the face and tongue. Tardive dyskinesia may not go away, even if you stop taking ZYPREXA. It may also start after you stop taking ZYPREXA. Tell your doctor if you get any body movements that you can not control.
    • Decreased blood pressure when you change positions, with symptoms of dizziness, fast or slow heartbeat, or fainting.
    • Difficulty swallowing, that can cause food or liquid to get into your lungs.
    • Seizures: Tell your doctor if you have a seizure during treatment with ZYPREXA.
    • Problems with control of body temperature: You could become very hot, for instance when you exercise a lot or stay in an area that is very hot. It is important for you to drink water to avoid dehydration. Call your doctor right away if you become severely ill and have any of these symptoms of dehydration:
      • sweating too much or not at all
      • dry mouth
      • feeling very hot
      • feeling thirsty
      • not able to produce urine.

    Common side effects of ZYPREXA include: lack of energy, dry mouth, increased appetite, sleepiness, tremor (shakes), having hard or infrequent stools, dizziness, changes in behavior, or restlessness.

    Other common side effects in teenagers (13-17 years old) include: headache, stomach-area (abdominal) pain, pain in your arms or legs, or tiredness. Teenagers experienced greater increases in prolactin, liver enzymes, and sleepiness, as compared with adults.

    Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

    These are not all the possible side effects with ZYPREXA. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

    Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

    How should I store ZYPREXA?

    • Store ZYPREXA at room temperature, between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C).
    • Keep ZYPREXA away from light.
    • Keep ZYPREXA dry and away from moisture.

    Keep ZYPREXA and all medicines out of the reach of children.

    General information about ZYPREXA

    Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Medication Guide. Do not use ZYPREXA for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not give ZYPREXA to other people, even if they have the same condition. It may harm them.

    This Medication Guide summarizes the most important information about ZYPREXA. If you would like more information, talk with your doctor. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist for information about ZYPREXA that was written for healthcare professionals. For more information about ZYPREXA call 1-800-Lilly-Rx (1-800-545-5979) or visit www.zyprexa.com.

    What are the ingredients in ZYPREXA?

    Active ingredient: olanzapine


    This Medication Guide has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

    Medication Guide revised January 5, 2010

    Eli Lilly and Company
    Indianapolis, IN 46285, USA

    www.zyprexa.com

    Copyright © 2009, 2010, Eli Lilly and Company. All rights reserved.

    PV 6922 AMP

    Revised: 11/2010 Eli Lilly and Company
  • PRINCIPAL DISPLAY PANEL

    image of labelimage of label


  • INGREDIENTS AND APPEARANCE
    ZYPREXA 
    olanzapine tablet
    Product Information
    Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:35356-317(NDC:0002-4115)
    Route of Administration ORAL
    Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
    Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
    OLANZAPINE (UNII: N7U69T4SZR) (OLANZAPINE - UNII:N7U69T4SZR) OLANZAPINE 15 mg
    Inactive Ingredients
    Ingredient Name Strength
    CARNAUBA WAX (UNII: R12CBM0EIZ)  
    CROSPOVIDONE (UNII: 68401960MK)  
    HYDROXYPROPYL CELLULOSE (UNII: RFW2ET671P)  
    HYPROMELLOSES (UNII: 3NXW29V3WO)  
    LACTOSE (UNII: J2B2A4N98G)  
    MAGNESIUM STEARATE (UNII: 70097M6I30)  
    CELLULOSE, MICROCRYSTALLINE (UNII: OP1R32D61U)  
    Product Characteristics
    Color blue (Elliptical) Score no score
    Shape ROUND (tablet) Size 9mm
    Flavor Imprint Code LILLY;4415
    Contains     
    Packaging
    # Item Code Package Description Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
    1 NDC:35356-317-30 30 in 1 BOTTLE, PLASTIC
    Marketing Information
    Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
    NDA NDA020592 07/12/2012
    Labeler - Lake Erie Medical DBA Quality Care Products LLC (831276758)
    Establishment
    Name Address ID/FEI Business Operations
    Eli Lilly and Company 006421325 manufacture
    Establishment
    Name Address ID/FEI Business Operations
    LakeErie Medical DBA Quality Care Products LLC 831276758 relabel